Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults

Over 500 million people interact daily with Facebook. Yet, whether Facebook use influences subjective well-being over time is unknown. We addressed this issue using experience-sampling, the most reliable method for measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience. We text-messaged people five times per day for two-weeks to examine how Facebook use influences the two components of subjective well-being: how people feel moment-to-moment and how satisfied they are with their lives. Our results indicate that Facebook use predicts negative shifts on both of these variables over time. The more people used Facebook at one time point, the worse they felt the next time we text-messaged them; the more they used Facebook over two-weeks, the more their life satisfaction levels declined over time. Interacting with other people “directly” did not predict these negative outcomes. They were also not moderated by the size of people’s Facebook networks, their perceived supportiveness, motivation for using Facebook, gender, loneliness, self-esteem, or depression. On the surface, Facebook provides an invaluable resource for fulfilling the basic human need for social connection. Rather than enhancing well-being, however, these findings suggest that Facebook may undermine it.

Citation: Kross E, Verduyn P, Demiralp E, Park J, Lee DS, Lin N, et al. (2013) Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults. PLoS ONE 8(8): e69841. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Editor: Cédric Sueur, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, France

The Study in more detail, notes:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Breaking the Black Box: What Facebook Knows About You – ProPublica

“Facebook has a particularly comprehensive set of dossiers on its more than 2 billion members. Every time a Facebook member likes a post, tags a photo, updates their favorite movies in their profile, posts a comment about a politician, or changes their relationship status, Facebook logs it. When they browse the Web, Facebook collects information about pages they visit that contain Facebook sharing buttons. When they use Instagram or WhatsApp on their phone, which are both owned by Facebook, they contribute more data to Facebook’s dossier.

And in case that wasn’t enough, Facebook also buys data about its users’ mortgages, car ownership and shopping habits from some of the biggest commercial data brokers.

Facebook uses all this data to offer marketers a chance to target ads to increasingly specific groups of people. Indeed, we found Facebook offers advertisers more than 1,300 categories for ad targeting — everything from people whose property size is less than .26 acres to households with exactly seven credit cards. More:

https://www.propublica.org/article/breaking-the-black-box-what-facebook-knows-about-you

SH Note: Especially young people should be aware that it takes little imagination to see how easily future employers and governments can, and very likely do at times, access any public (and theoretically not so public) information that users publish about themselves (and family / friend networks) on social media and similar venues. Personality profiles are then fairly easily inferred and constructed from such data, whether such profiles reflect the total “picture” or not. Not all of it can be false, the data miners know.

That all of this can, for good or ill, impact in some degree one’s future should go without saying —SH

And then comes this:

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3688830/facebook-like-button-defamation-switzerland/

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